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Courses

BIOL 101G: Life on Earth
1 course credit

A broad survey of organisms and life processes and the forces that shaped and continue to shape our ecosystem.

BIOL 109: Plants and Society
1 course credit

This non-majors Gen Ed course introduces the multitude of ways humans interact with plants. Topics include the origins of agriculture, manipulation of plants by people, plant secondary compounds as sources of spices, medicines and drugs, and genetic engineering of plants. Students will be introduced to important elements of botany, chemistry, anthropology, archaeology, and history in both lecture and laboratory.

BIOL 150G: Investigating Biological Concepts
1 course credit

An investigative approach to learning fundamental concepts in biology from molecules to cells to organisms. Concepts will include: the process of scientific inquiry, basic biochemistry, basic cell function (cellular respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis, genetics, cell division), and fundamentals of animal and plant physiology. Labs will emphasize problem-based or inquiry-based learning. Lectures will combine traditional format with problem-posing and questioning.

BIOL 155G: Introduction to Evolution, Ecology and Diversity
1 course credit

An investigative approach to learning fundamental concepts in biology from organisms to ecosystems. Concepts will include: the process of scientific inquiry, mechanisms of evolution, the evolutionary history of biological diversity, and fundamentals of ecology. Labs will emphasize problem-based or inquiry-based learning. Lectures will combine traditional format with problem-posing and questioning.

BIOL 200: Cell Biology
1 course credit

Introductory study of the structure and function of living cells and their components. Laboratory will employ basic cell/molecular biology techniques and include: the preparation of reagents, DNA isolation, plasmid manipulation and DNA transfection. Students will have the opportunity to apply current recombinant in vitro DNA technology in preparation and expression of a transgene using a prokaryotic system.

Prerequisites: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 or 155 and CHEM 140.

BIOL 201G: Field Botany
1 course credit

An introduction to plant identification and the study of plant associations and the physical conditions that permit their development. The laboratory takes the form of weekly field trips to various types of plant habitats. This course is appropriate for both majors and non-majors, and has no prerequisite.

BIOL 202: Genetics
1 course credit

An introduction to the principles of heredity in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, including the contemporary understanding of genes and gene mechanisms. Laboratory exercises use animals, plants and microorganisms to elucidate genetic principles.

Prerequisites: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 or 155 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 203: Comparative Vertebrate Morphology
1 course credit

A comparative and functional study of vertebrate anatomy from an evolutionary perspective.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 204: Human Anatomy and Physiology
1 course credit

A systematic analysis of the structure and function of the human body.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 210: Biological Research Methods
1 course credit

An introduction to research methods used in biological sciences including: 1) the literature search, reasing and evaluation scientific literature, scientific writing, and incorporating previous literature into a proposal for research; 2) an introduction to commonly used statistical analyses focusing on an understanding of when specific common tests are appropriate and how to interpret them and utilize appropriate statistical software; 3) a very brief introduction to applications of mathematical modeling such as calculus to investigating biological problems.

BIOL 250: Special Topics
.25-1 course credit

Courses in special topics are offered on an occasional basis in response to instructor and student demand for varying credit.

BIOL 290: Wilderness
.5 course credit

An exploration of the values of wilderness via direct experience and readings. We will travel to a specific wilderness ecosystem to consider the history of human interactions with wilderness and the demands and impacts on the wilderness by modern as well as indigenous cultures. The values of wilderness to human existence, both material and spiritual, will be examined.

BIOL 300: Special Problems
.25-.75 course credit

A special course in a laboratory exercise, a field problem, or readings for the student who wishes to investigate a topic in biology beyond those normally offered. The particular problem is selected in consultation with the biology faculty.

BIOL 302: Microbiology
1 course credit

A general study of microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and protists), emphasizing morphology, physiology, ecological relationships, and the nature of disease and its control. Consideration is also given to viruses. Laboratory sessions provide for experimental demonstration of basic concepts and for familiarization with fundamental microbiological methods.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 200. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 307: Ecology
1 course credit

An introduction to the principles and concepts that describe the interactions of living organisms with their environments. Laboratory sessions involve field study of local flora and fauna and their habitats with the aim of illustrating fundamental concepts and basic ecological methodology.

Prerequisites: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 and 155. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MATH 207.

BIOL 308: Vertebrate Embryology
1 course credit

A descriptive study of development and differentiation in vertebrates. Laboratory sessions are balanced between detailed microscopic examination of vertebrate embryos and experimental study of growth processes. Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 or 155. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 315: Conservation Biology
1 course credit

Advanced study of the science of conserving biological diversity. Lecture will focus on animal systematics, zoogeography, and conservation biology of animals (with reference to plants). Labs will emphasize identifying, collecting, and monitoring animal diversity in the field with a focus on conservation goals. Taught in alternate years.

Prerequisite BIOL155 and junior standing (or instructor’s consent).

BIOL 320: Parasitology
1 course credit

A general study of the biology of parasitism. Lectures and labs will emphasize systematics and taxonomy of the major groups, complex life cycles of parasites, behavioral and physiological effects of parasites on hosts (including humans), and how human modifications of landscapes affect parasites. Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 and BIOL 155. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 325: Advanced Physiology
1 course credit

Detailed study of human and comparative cellular and systemic physiology, emphasizing muscle, cardiovascular, neural, respiratory, renal, and reproductive physiology. Advanced Physiology will build on fundamental knowledge acquired in BIOL 204. Laboratory exercises will be both descriptive and experimental.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 204. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 333: Evolution
1 course credit

Evolution encompasses the synthesis of all of biology from molecules to ecology. In doing so, evolution addresses the fundamental paradox: the diversity of living organisms. This course offers an exploration of the processes of evolutionary change in animals, plants and microbes. Population genetics, microevolution, speciation, adaptive radiation, and macroevolution will be addressed. Also, the origin of Homo sapiens will be considered.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 202. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 345: Animal Behavior
1 course credit

(Cross-listed as PSYC 345) A study of the diverse and fascinating range of animal behavior. How do we explain that in various animals we can observe infanticide, competition, and polygamy, but also cooperation, altruism, and monogamy? Using an evolutionary approach, this course will examine both the proximate mechanisms and ultimate reasons that explain the great variety of animal behavior as elucidated by animal behaviorists through ingenious experimentation and patient observation.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in PSYC 101 or BIOL 150 or 155. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 350: Science Seminar
.25 course credit

An introduction to the literature of the physical and biological sciences, providing the student with the opportunity to prepare and present reports. Speakers from outside the College are invited to speak each semester. May be repeated for credit. Credit/No Credit.

BIOL 354: Molecular Biology
1 course credit

An in-depth look at DNA, RNA, and proteins. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of nucleic acids and on DNA-protein interactions. The control of such processes as DNA replication, gene expression, and protein translation in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems will be addressed.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 200 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 355: Molecular Biology Laboratory
.5 course credit

Molecular biology laboratory is the companion course to BIOL 354 and will practice concepts taught in the lecture. Emphasis is on the three principle molecules in molecular biology: DNA, RNA and proteins. Exercises include: Northern and Southern blotting, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 200 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 390: Internship in Biological Sciences
.25-.75 course credit

An experience designed to allow students to apply biological theory and concepts to practice in a work environment within the field of biology. Students are required to complete the following: a journal maintained during the work experience, an essay summarizing and integrating the internship experience with prior course work, and a public oral presentation.

BIOL 440: Research I
.5 course credit

An individual research project chosen by the student in consultation with the biology faculty. Includes designing and executing a research project as well as keeping a detailed laboratory notebook.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 322.

BIOL 450: Research II
.5 course credit

Continuation of Research I. Students are expected to finish the research projects they began in BIOL 440. The main focus of this course will be analyzing and presenting research results in poster format and in a formal scientific paper. Students will be further required to serve as mentors to their peers enrolled in Research I.

Prerequisite: BIOL 440.

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