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We do History from the documents up!

Monmouth College we are proud of our unique curriculum. As a first-year student, you'll start by studying primary documents--letters, trial records, memoirs, bumper stickers, church bulletins--anything written at the time of the event. Take classes on the atomic bomb, the massacre at Waco, the London Blitz, Lincoln's assassination, or the archeology of ancient Rome--but draw your own conclusions by studying only the documents of that era.

Then broaden the picture in your sophomore year. The American Revolution, Women: The 51% Minority, Henry VIII, Pirates of the Caribbean, and other such courses will allow you to read the writings of fine historians who themselves utilized primary sources to create the historical narrative. Put all your skills to use in our junior-level research classes and work closely with your professor to write a paper for possible publication or presentation at a historical conference.

Finally, weave together all of your Monmouth College classes in our senior-level survey courses. These classes are exciting discussions! Every day is a give-and-take as professors and students analyze the changing past. And we highly recommend off-campus study! Go walk the places you've learned about and immerse yourself in another culture!

If you'd like to teach social studies, our unique curriculum will make your resume stand out. If you want to attend law school or graduate school, you will have the advantage of understanding History from the documents up, unlike most students who never seriously studied primary documents.

If you don't want to teach, Monmouth College offers a three-level Archives sequence. Museum studies, archival work, and library science open up to you with our hands-on approach. Very few undergraduates ever get to work in an actual archive and learn about acquisition, preservation, and exhibition of artifacts and documents. Our alums go on to fabulous careers because they already have what few other undergrads ever get: experience.

Bringing the past to life means understanding historical causes and their effects, investigating change and continuity over time, and assessing how the past continues to shape who we are as a nation and as a world. History is a crucial part of every liberal arts education, because the study of history involves an investigation of the human condition from every continent and every era. Historical study broadens horizons, enables comparisons, and creates more informed citizens.

We emphasize critical reading for the nuances in the historical record; thoughtful and absorbing research in primary and secondary sources; and careful, clear writing. Our professors are passionate about the history they study and teach, and their enthusiasm is infectious.

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