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Courses

BIOC 300: Bioinformatics
1 course credit

This course introduces the fundamentals of computational biology, including the emerging fields of genomics (the study of an organism’s entire complement of DNA) and proteomics (the study of the entire set of proteins expressed by a particular cell type). The course covers the basics of searching large databases of genetic information and interpreting the results that are obtained from such searches. The determination of DNA and protein structure by computational methods will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: BIOL 202. Offered occasionally.

BIOC 330: Biochemistry
1 course credit

Structure and function of biologically important molecules and their role(s) in life processes. Protein conformation, enzymatic mechanisms, nucleic acid conformation, and special topics will be analyzed. Prior completion of BIOL 150 is highly recommended. The 4-hour laboratory emphasizes spectrophotometry, enzyme purification and kinetics. Students will also complete a project using a variety of molecular biology and biochemical techniques.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHEM 220 and 230

BIOC 390: Advanced Biochemistry
1 course credit

A study of advanced topics in biochemistry including metabolism, information processing, biochemical aspects of disease, and current biochemical findings.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in BIOC 330.

BIOC 420: Independent Study
0.25 or 0.5 course credit

A laboratory, library, or fieldwork topic of special interest to the student pursued under the supervision of a faculty member. The project may be performed off campus. A substantial written report, as described in the course syllabus, is required in the final semester of research.

BIOC 430: Research
0.25 or 0.5 course credit

An original laboratory project chosen in consultation with the science faculty. The project may be performed off campus. A substantial written report, as described in the course syllabus, is required in the final semester of research.

BIOL 150G: Investigating Biological Concepts
1 course credit

An investigative approach to learning fundamental concepts in biology from molecules to cells to organisms. Concepts will include: the process of scientific inquiry, basic biochemistry, basic cell function (cellular respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis, genetics, cell division), and fundamentals of animal and plant physiology. Labs will emphasize problem-based or inquiry-based learning. Lectures will combine traditional format with problem-posing and questioning.

BIOL 200: Cell Biology
1 course credit

Introductory study of the structure and function of living cells and their components. Laboratory will employ basic cell/molecular biology techniques and include the preparation of reagents, DNA isolation, plasmid manipulation and DNA transfection. Students will have the opportunity to apply current recombinant in vitro DNA technology in preparation and expression of a transgene using a prokaryotic system.

Prerequisites: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 or 155 and CHEM 140 or permission of the instructor

BIOL 202: Genetics
1 course credit

An introduction to the principles of heredity in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, including the contemporary understanding of genes and gene mechanisms. Laboratory exercises use animals, plants and microorganisms to elucidate genetic principles.

Prerequisites: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 150 or 155 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 302: Microbiology
1 course credit

A general study of microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and protists), emphasizing morphology, physiology, ecological relationships, and the nature of disease and its control. Consideration is also given to viruses. Laboratory sessions provide for experimental demonstration of basic concepts and for familiarization with fundamental microbiological methods.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 200. Offered in alternate years.

BIOL 354: Molecular Biology
1 course credit

An in-depth look at DNA, RNA, and proteins. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of nucleic acids and on DNA-protein interactions. The control of such processes as DNA replication, gene expression, and protein translation in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems will be addressed. Taught in alternate years.

Prerequisite: A grade of C− or better in BIOL 200 or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 355: Molecular Biology Laboratory
0.5 course credit

Molecular biology laboratory is the companion course to BIOL 354 and will practice concepts taught in the lecture. Emphasis is on the three principle molecules in molecular biology: DNA, RNA and proteins. Exercises include: Northern and Southern blotting, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Taught in alternate years.

Prerequisite:A grade of C− or better in BIOL 200 or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 140G: General Chemistry I
1 course credit

A general study of the properties, structure, and bonding of elements and compounds. Chemical calculations and an introduction to chemical thermodynamics are also included. This course also includes a three-hour laboratory session each week.

CHEM 220: Introductory Analytical Chemistry
1 course credit

An introduction to data analysis, quantitative principles of chemical equilibrium, and quantitative analysis. The course also includes a 4-hour laboratory session each week that emphasizes precision and accuracy in the laboratory, scientific writing and data analysis.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHEM 140.

CHEM 228: Organic Chemistry I
1 course credit

A study of organic chemistry including the structure and reactions of some biologically important molecules. This course also includes a three-hour laboratory session each week. A focus on how structure affects the properties of organic molecules.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHEM 220 or in (CHEM 140 and consent of instructor).

CHEM 230: Organic Chemistry II
1 course credit

A study of the structure and reactivity of organic molecules, including kinetics and reaction mechanisms. This course also includes a three-hour laboratory session each week.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHEM 228.

CHEM 312: Physical Chemistry I
1 course credit

A study of classical chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Includes a four-hour laboratory each week which emphasizes modern physical and biophysical chemistry methods.

Prerequisites: CHEM 220, MATH 152 and PHYS 132.

CHEM 322: Physical Chemistry II
1 course credit

A study of quantum mechanics and basic theoretical/computation chemistry. Includes a four-hour laboratory each week which emphasizes spectroscopy and computational approaches to chemical systems.

Prerequisites: CHEM 220, MATH 152 and PHYS 132.

CHEM 325: Integrated Laboratory
0.5 course credit

Laboratory projects employing techniques from all areas of chemistry, but emphasizing synthesis and instrumental techniques. Scientific writing and presentation methods are addressed.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in CHEM 220, and CHEM 230. Co-requisite: CHEM 340.

CHEM 340: Instrumental Analysis
1 course credit

A study of the principles and practice of modern instrumental methods of analysis and of chemical instrumentation. Spectroscopic, chromatographic and surface analysis techniques are emphasized.

Prerequsite: C- or better in CHEM 220, and CHEM 230. Co-requisite: CHEM 325.

CHEM 350: Science Seminar

An introduction to the literature of the physical and biological sciences providing the student with the opportunity to prepare and present oral reports. Required of juniors and seniors majoring in biochemistry; students enrolled in BIOC 430 must also enroll in CHEM 350. A non-credit bearing requirement for the biochemistry major.

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